Newsletter

Freshly roasted hojicha, Valentine's tea, & new projects

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It was Lunar New Year last week, and we drank koicha in my chado (Japanese tea ceremony) class to celebrate. Auspicious symbols found at the beginning of the year—pine, cranes, and bamboo—were hung in my teacher's home alongside small mice (nezumi / ねずみ) tchotchkes dressed in red ribbons.And did you drink obukucha this new year? We drank our honyama sencha with umeboshi and a knot of kelp in hopes of good fortune; this beverage is more of a soup that could do with a bit of miso if we are speaking strictly about flavor.We have been working on a number of projects this January. Take a look...

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Solitude & new green teas

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What is on your mind these days? As for us, we are starting to think about the coming months' restoration and solitude.In Japanese, there is only one word for being alone: "kodoku (孤独)," but this word is more akin to loneliness than solitude. The closest phrase might be "yuyujiteki (悠々自適)," which means "living by oneself free from worldly cares." This idea of peace from one's self, however, is not praised in Japanese culture, unless doing so shares a common purpose with society. It is an interesting distinction between Western and Eastern values.On to tea things: our newest tea collection is...

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Autumn matcha

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Tsubokiri (壺切)—literally, "breaking the seal"—refers to the autumn tradition of opening and tasting the year's harvest of ceremonial matcha and gyokuro for the first time.

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Gyokuro season

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We have been waiting patiently for October—the crisp, nostalgic autumn air arrives and persimmons (かき・柿) and pumpkins (かぼちゃ) emerge, as does the year's gyokuros.

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